Installations - Advanced Install Configurations

Table of Contents

Adding SUDO Users with Root Privileges to Log On to a UNIX Client

Prerequisites

  • For HP-UX, AIX and Solaris computers, install SUDO on the client before adding a SUDO user.
  • On Solaris computers, edit the /etc/default/login configuration file and set the "PATH=" variable to the directory where SUDO is installed.

Steps

  1. Log on to the client computer as root.
  2. Run the following command to edit the /etc/sudoers configuration file.

    visudo

  3. Add the SUDO user.
    • If you want users to perform all UNIX commands as root users, enter the following:

      sudouser ALL=(ALL) ALL

      To remove the password prompt during the computer login, specify NOPASSWD: ALL as follows:

      sudouser ALL=(ALL) NOPASSWD: ALL

    • If you want users to only run SnapProtect commands as root users, enter the following:

      ## Allow users to install and run SnapProtect commands
      Cmnd_Alias DVDINSTALLCMDS =/DVD_Mount_Location/cvpkgadd
      Cmnd_Alias DVDUNINSTALLCMDS =/usr/bin/cvpkgrm

      ## Path to the SnapProtect Installation directory
      Cmnd_Alias INSTALLDIRCMDS = Installation_Directory/*

      sudouser ALL = DVDINSTALLCMDS, DVDUNINSTALLCMDS, INSTALLDIRCMDS, /bin/sh, /usr/bin/SnapProtect

Changing Group Ownership for SnapProtect Files and Directories After Installing a Software Component on UNIX

You can use a script available in the /usr/bin directory to change the group ownership of SnapProtect files and directories.

  1. Ensure that no jobs are running in any SnapProtect instance.
  2. From the command prompt, run the command cvpkgchg.

    Example:

    [root@unxc1 ~]# cvpkgchg

  3. Type 1 and press Enter.

    Selecting Tasks to Change Unix Group and Permissions

    Please choose one or more tasks from the list below.
    Please note if you choose both Change and Fix, only Fix will take effect.

    [X] 1) Change Unix Group
    [ ] 2) Change access permissions
    [ ] 3) Fix Unix group and access permissions

    [a=all n=none r=reverse q=quit d=done >=next <=previous ?=help]
    Enter number(s)/one of "a,n,r,q,d,<,<,?" here:

  4. Type the new group name and press Enter.
  5. Restart The SnapProtect services for all instances to change the group ownership.

Changing Permissions for SnapProtect Files and Directories After Installing a Software Component on UNIX

By default, the root user and all the users in the administrative group have full permissions on all SnapProtect files and directories. For other users, you can assign required permissions as follows:

  1. Ensure that no jobs are running on any SnapProtect instance. You have to restart SnapProtect services for all instances to change the permissions.
  2. From the command prompt, run the command cvpkgchg.

    Example:

    [root@unxc1 ~]# cvpkgchg

  3. Type 2 and press Enter.

    Selecting Tasks to Change Unix Group and Permissions

    Please choose one or more tasks from the list below.
    Please note if you choose both Change and Fix, only Fix will take effect.

    [ ] 1) Change Unix Group
    [X] 2) Change access permissions
    [ ] 3) Fix Unix group and access permissions

    [a=all n=none r=reverse q=quit d=done >=next <=previous ?=help]
    Enter number(s)/one of "a,n,r,q,d,<,<,?" here:

  4. Select the type of permission that you want to assign to other users and press Enter.
  5. Type Yes to change the permissions.
  6. Restart The SnapProtect services for all instances to change the permissions.

Consider the following when changing the permissions for SnapProtect files and directories:

  • If you remove "write" permissions for the SnapProtect install group, some SnapProtect directories will continue to have "write" permissions in order to allow backup and restore operations to complete.

    The following dialog might be displayed if "write" permissions are removed:

    The backup or restore may need restricted full access permissions for group users to some specific paths such as registry, temp directory, log directory and job results directory.
    Do you want to grant the restricted access for group users? [yes]

  • Depending on the file type, the actual permissions set might be more restrictive. For example, a text file may not have the executable bit turned on.
  • If you run the installer to add more instances or modules, you need to rerun this utility to fix certain files changed during the install. Do not use this script for multiple SnapProtect instances from different releases.
  • If the snapshots are mounted within SnapProtect installation directory, you may receive the following error:

    Executables(/opt/InstallDir) ... FAILED

    You can ignore this error and continue running the script.

Creating User Groups to Install or Upgrade SnapProtect on a Macintosh Computer

For Macintosh, use the following steps to create user groups with permissions to install/upgrade SnapProtect:

  1. From the Finder, go to the NetInfo Manager utility by selecting Applications > Utilities > NetInfo Manager .
  2. Select Security > Authenticate.
  3. In the pop-up screen, enter a user name and password with administration privileges.
  4. Highlight Groups.
  5. Select Directory > New Subdirectory > Get “New_Directory”.
  6. Change “New_Directory” to a user-defined directory name.
  7. Select Directory > New Properties.
  8. Assign the property name GID and property value 777.
  9. Save the changes and update the copy.

Enabling User Authentication during Installations

When user authentication is enabled in the CommCell, then during the installation of an agent, users are prompted to enter the username and password associated with their CommCell user account (or an external domain user account ) to authorize the installation.

Use the following steps to enable user authentication:

  1. From the CommCell Browser, right-click the <CommServe> and then click Properties.
  2. Click the Security tab.
  3. Click the Require Authentication for Agent Installation check box.
  4. Click OK.

During installation, the user will see a dialog box similar to the one below for a Windows install. In this dialog box the user needs to provide their credentials to proceed with the installation.

Installing the CommServe Software Using an Existing SQL Server Instance

If you want to use an existing instance of SQL server that was not installed by SnapProtect , then configure the szUserSQLInstanceName registry key on the computer on which you want to perform the installation.

Use the following steps to configure the szUserSQLInstanceName registry key:

  1. Log on to the computer as an Administrator or as a member of the Administrator group.
  2. Click the Windows Start button and then click Run.
  3. Type regedit and then click OK to open the Registry Editor window.
  4. Navigate to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE > SOFTWARE > GalaxyInstallerFlags.
  5. Right click the GalaxyInstallerFlags and select New > String Value.
  6. Specify the Value name as szUserSQLInstanceName.
  7. Double click szUserSQLInstanceName, in the Value data box, type the name of the SQL instance that you want to use and click OK.
  8. Close the Registry Editor window.

SQL Server 2008 R2 Instances

You cannot use an existing SQL Server 2008 R2 instance to be used by the CommServe database. However, you can select an existing SQL Server 2008 instance.

If you are using SQL Server 2008 with your CommServe database and you want to move it to a SQL Server 2008 R2 instance, then upgrade the NetApp database instance on the CommServe to SQL Server 2008 R2 version using the SQL Server 2008 R2 disc.

Installing SnapProtect in a Different Language

By default, the software installer uses the language set up in the operating system of the client. You can select a different language to install the SnapProtect software by configuring the registry key bShowLanguageDialog. This causes a language selection dialog box to appear during the software installation. You can use this dialog box to select your preferred language.

Use the following steps to configure the bShowLanguageDialog registry key:

  1. Log on to the computer as an Administrator or as a member of the Administrator group.
  2. Click the Windows Start button and then click Run.
  3. Type regedit and then click OK to open the Registry Editor window.
  4. Navigate to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE > SOFTWARE > GalaxyInstallerFlags.
  5. Right click the GalaxyInstallerFlags and then select New > DWORD Value.
  6. Specify the Value name as bShowLanguageDialog.
  7. Double click bShowLanguageDialog, specify the Value data as 1 and click OK.
  8. Close the Registry Editor window.

Modifying the Default Values for Native Package Installation

You can modify the default values for native package installations on AIX, HP-UX, Linux and Solaris computers.

  1. Create the native package using the steps described in the Install Using Native Package section. For example, for HP-UX platform, see Install Using Native Package.
  2. Create a sample file using the following command and save the file to /etc/ location.

    ./cvpkgadd -script silent_answer_example.xml >> /etc/cvsi.xml

  3. Edit the Sample xml file as per the requirement.
  4. Install the native package using the following command:

    ./silent_install -param [param_file]

    Example:

    ./silent_install -param /etc/cvsi.xml

Updating the Branding Settings of a UNIX Installation Package

By default, the UNIX installation package that you create from the Download Manager has the following main branding settings:

  • Installs the software binaries in the /opt/snapprotect/ directory.
  • Sets the snapprotect script to check and manage the software processes, such as starting or stopping services.
  • Uses the name "snapprotect" to set the UNIX group.

If you want to change the branding settings of the installation package to use a different brand name, you need to update the install.gz file located in the installation package.

Use the following steps to specify the new branding settings:

  1. Navigate to the directory where the installation package resides and run the following command:

    find Updates -name install.gz

    The command returns the location of the install.gz file. For example, the following is a sample output from a Macintosh installation package:

    Updates/dwn-x86/ServicePacks/SP6/darwin/Base0/install.gz

  2. Run the following command to unzip the file using the location path you obtained in the first step:

    gunzip Path_to_Install_File

    For example:

    gunzip Updates/dwn-x86/ServicePacks/SP6/darwin/Base0/install.gz

  3. Run the following command to edit the unzipped file:

    vi Path_to_Install_File

    Once the file is opened for editing, update the value of the following variables with the new brand name.

    • BRAND_INSSUBDIR[7], which sets the subdirectory name under the opt directory.
    • BRAND_SSCRIPT[7], which sets the script for checking and managing the software processes.
    • BRAND_GALGROUP[7], which sets the UNIX group name.

    After specifying the new brand name, save and close the file.

  4. Run the following command to zip the file again:

    gzip Path_to_Install_File

    Future installations from the package will use the new brand name.