Wildcards

The supported wildcards include:

Wildcards Description
* Any number of any characters. For example:

*.doc -  any file name with the extension ".doc" (e.g., status.doc, mission.doc)

a*.dll - any file name that begins with "a" and has the extension .dll (e.g., alsvc.dll, advdcc.dll)

? Any one character. For example:

access? - any file name that begins with- "access" followed by any one character (e.g., access1, access5).

[ ] Any range of characters. For example:

[ei]nsure.doc - any file name that ends with "nsure.doc" and begins either "e" or "i". (e.g., ensure.doc, insure.doc)

[a-m].doc - any file name that ends with ".doc" and begins with the letters "a" through "m" inclusive.

For Windows, if the default subclient is associated with a subclient policy and these wildcards are used in the subclient policy, then the wildcards will be treated as literal characters.

[! ] The negation of a range of characters. For example:

[!ei]nsure.doc - any file name that ends with "nsure.doc", but does not begin with "e" or "i". (e.g., unsure.doc)

For Windows, if the default subclient is associated with a subclient policy and these wildcards are used in the subclient policy, then the wildcards will be treated as literal characters.

** Any directory level. For example:

Windows

C:\**\move.cpp - the file named move.cpp located at any directory level under the c: drive. (e.g., c:\info\com\move.cpp)

C:\sys*\** - all directories starting with sys will be filtered.

NetWare

VOL1:\**\move.cpp - the file named move.cpp located at any directory level under VOL1. (e.g., VOL1:\info\com\move.cpp)

VOL1:\sys*\** - all directories starting with sys will be filtered.

Unix

/opt/**/move.cpp - the file named move.cpp located at any directory level under the opt. (e.g., /opt/info/com/move.cpp)

/opt/sys*/** - all directories starting with sys will be filtered.

You can also use a combination of wildcards in a single expression. Some common examples are provided below.

Windows Directories

Windows File System iDataAgents allow you to filter directories by ending the filter with *\**. For example:

C:\**\temp*\**

*:\**\temp*\**

The above examples filter out all directories that start with "temp", such as "Temporary", "template", and "tempfiles", from either the C: volume or the entire computer.

You can also filter directories that start with a range of characters by using brackets, such as [a-g]. For example:

C:\Users\[a-g]*\** - filters out all directories starting with the letters "a" through "g" under the "C:\Users" directory.

Windows Files

Windows File System iDataAgents allow you to filter files by using a wildcard for the extension, such as *.log, or ending the filter with a wildcard, such as ntuser*. For example:

G:\Users\**\xpprofile\*.log - filters out all files with the ".log" extension from each user's "xpprofile" directory.

G:\Users\**\xpprofile\ntuser* - filters out all files beginning with "ntuser" from each user's "xpprofile" directory.

For Windows File System iDataAgents, when change journal is used to perform the scan, the same filter cannot be used to filter both a file and a directory at the same time. For example, C:\temp\pattern*\** would filter out all directories that match this pattern at a certain directory level, and C:\temp\pattern* would filter out all files that match this pattern at a certain directory level. Using classic file scan instead of change journal would allow you to use the same filter for both file and directory objects that match the same pattern.

For File Archiver Local File System Instance, wildcard characters are not supported for drive letters.